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The More You Know, ADLSF

A letter from our President

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Did you know that the MDNA Austin D. Lucas Scholarship Fund awards grants for college tuition to children whose parents are employed by MDNA member firms? This

Kristine Conroy, ADLS Fund President with Austin D. Lucas
Kristine Conroy, ADLS Fund President with Austin D. Lucas

member benefit is often called the “heart” of the MDNA. For those not familiar, MDNA’s Scholarship Fund was started by Austin D. Lucas in 1983. Austin D. Lucas was a pillar of the MDNA member family for many years. He started out in the business with his father and grandfather at J. L. Lucas & Sons, Inc. They joined the MDNA in 1953. Later he began his own company Austin D. Lucas Inc. In addition to his work for the Scholarship Fund, he served MDNA with distinction, rising through the ranks to serve as MDNA President in 1956 and 1957. Additionally, he served as LOCATOR Services Inc. President from 1970 to 1974.

Since the inception of the fund in 1983, 1,249 students have received scholarships totaling over $1,678,000. The scholarships awarded make a significant difference in the student’s tuition as the awards range from $1000 to $5000. The goal remains the same, as when it was founded, to help fund the college and trade school education of children whose parents work for firms belonging to MDNA. Every year the Trustees of the Fund award scholarship to this group of deserving children. This year the Fund awarded more than 55 scholarships. The Fund’s principal is never touched. Only the interest is awarded to deserving students. The Fund grows through interest earned by investments and the wonderful generosity of MDNA members and other donors. Donations are always welcome and directly benefit the students and their pursuit of an education.

Sarah B. Johnson
Sarah B. Johnson

This year Sarah B. Johnson was the standout scholarship recipient of the prestigious Austin D. Lucas Trust Award. This award commemorates the legacy of a man who dedicated many years to philanthropic endeavors and charitable work. Sarah exemplifies Austin’s spirit of generosity and dedication to the service of others.

You can read about all of this year’s recipients and more about the Austin D. Lucas Scholarship Fund here. 

MDNA President – Joe Lundvick, CEA, Perfection Global, LLC

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The Annual Tri-Chapter Met at OCC

MDNA’s New England Chapter, New York/New Jersey Chapter and Philadelphia Chapter met for their annual Tri-Chapter Meeting on December 7th, 2017. This years meeting focus was on”Manufacturing Partners” and was hosted by the Orange County Choppers (OCC) and sponsored by AUCTOAbba Freight Systems, LLC, and Direct Capital, A Division of CIT Bank, N.A.  See more photos from this event here 

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After five years off the air, Discovery Channel is reviving the iconic motorcycle-construction reality series American Chopper…. Read more about this story with Aaron Equipment, an MDNA Member Firm who has had three bikes built by OCC!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The More You Know, Recap on WWTP

A letter from our President
moreyouknowq2Dear MDNA Members,
Hope you were not one of our members who woke up Monday asking yourself if you missed anything good at the MDNA’s Weekend With The Pros. Because everyone that I spoke to had a fantastic time in Detroit. Everything was well organized, educational and inspiring. Thank you to the Detroit/Toledo Leadership Team of Ryan Yoder, Mauro Damino, Nick Gibbs and John Stencil, IV, for their efforts planning and organizing such successful tour stops and warehouse tours. Speaking of warehouse tours, thank you to MDNA Members, Gibbs Machinery Company, Presses for Industry LLC., Lee Stevens Machinery Inc., Equipment Trading Co. Inc. and Tramar Industries, for opening up their facilities to us. And a special thank you to Gibbs Machinery Company and Tramar Industries for hosting breakfast and dinner at their warehouses. If you missed the weekend you are not aware that John Becker of MDNA Member firm Heat Treat Equipment Co. hosted and sponsored an amazing lunch at Brewery Becker. This is an awesome brewery and I know I will be back there again.
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This weekend would also not be possible without the strong support of our sponsors.  Go here to see a full list of these great companies.
Additional thanks to MDNA Chapter Leadership Chairman Kevin Brewster for running what was reported to be a great leadership seminar and to First Vice President John Greene for running a hugely successful BOSS Seminar. This seminar was clearly the place to be on Thursday afternoon. With over 50 MDNA owners present there was not topic off limits and I think it is safe to say that we all walked away with new insight from our fellow members.
Clearly the MDNA accomplished several of its missions this past weekend by providing industry education, networking and opportunities to do business. Thanks to all who participated.
If you missed it, you missed a great event. I encourage anyone who missed this weekend to talk to me or one of the over 150 who attended to learn more about what you missed. These are great events that all should attend.

 

MDNA President – Joe Lundvick, CEA
Perfection Global, LLC
To find more of these letters from our President in the future, simply go to the search bar in the upper right hand corner and search: “The More You Know”  
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The More You Know, Did you know we have a machinery Library?

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A letter from our President
Did you know that the MDNA Library has more than 35,000 (and growing), operating manuals, parts books, specification sheets, sales catalogs and other publications dealing with the metalworking and capital equipment industry?  In many cases, the Library copyMDNA library is the only place where copies of catalogs and manuals on unusual or older machines can be obtained.   Access to this resource is only available to MDNA members and best of all it’s free.  Simply call the MDNA or use www.mdna.org, and login to the Member’s Only Back Office, under Resources, to search and request library information.
 –MDNA President – Joe Lundvick, CEA
Perfection Global, LLC

 

 


 

To find more of these letters from our President in the future, simply go to the search bar in the upper right hand corner and search: “The More You Know” 

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The More You Know, Letter from our President on Harvey

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Dear MDNA Members, We are Family!

Yes, we do business together on one deal, compete on the next and yes, some members conduct auctions while others buy and sell from their inventory, but the greatest attribute of this Association is the undeniable fact that we are one family.

During last week’s hurricane, our members in Harvey’s path experienced devastation of unprecedented magnitude. But as soon as the storm broke we heard from one local member after another telling us that they were okay and that they cannot believe the outpouring of calls and offers of support from their Used Machinery Family.

I have no doubt that if any one of us needed anything in the wake of this tragedy, the impending Irma or any other crisis big or small, that MDNA members would be lined up to support one another.

Sometimes “the more you know” is knowing who has your back!

MDNA President – Joe Lundvick, CEA
Perfection Global, LLC
I salute all who weathered Harvey and below is a list of our used machinery family in Texas and Louisiana just in case you want to share your support:
Texas
 
  • Firm: Akjetam Co., LLC Contact Name: Mr. Vincent W. Matejka Phone: +1 281 463 4105 Emails: vince@akjetam.com
  • Firm: FMI Trading LLC Contact Name: Mr. Frank Friesen Phone: +1 915 207 5844 Emails: trade.fmi@gmail.com
  • Firm: Investment Recovery Services Contact Name: Mr. Gregg Trenor Phone: +1 817 222 9848 Emails: gt@irsauction.com
  • Firm: OMNI Machine Tool Corp. Contact Name: Mr. Kerry Introligator Phone: +1 713 278 1700/ +1 877 666 4622 Emails: kiomni@aol.com
  • Firm: Plant & Machinery Inc. Contact Name: Mr. Ron Moore Phone: +1 713 691 4401 Emails: ronm@pmi-auction.com
  • Firm: Rosen Systems Inc. Contact Name: Mr. Michael D. Rosen Phone: +1 972 248 2266 Emails: miker@rosensystems.com
Louisiana  

 

To find more of these letters from our President in the future, simply go to the search bar in the upper right hand corner and search: “The More You Know” 

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What you need to know before purchasing a shear for metalworking

Written by, Andy Kamashian, AEA Southern Fabricating Machinery Sales, Inc. (MDNA Member Firm) 

shear1Shearing is one of the oldest metal working process available and is usually the first process, and machine that is used when manufacturing fabricated parts. All shears are rated on their capability to cut steel and should be selected according to the capacity required as related to steel.  If your application is Stainless Steel, you should select a shear that is rated for approximately 1.5-2x the material thickness you are using. Should you be shearing Aluminum, a shear sized for 1/2 the amount of material thickness you are working with is likely sufficient.shear2

On the next page of this section we have included a shearing capacity chart for your reference. Note: Although there are small pneumatic, hand or foot operated shears (mostly used in HVAC and the Roofing Industries) and “Alligator” type shears (used in the scrap and recycling industries), this introduction will be focusing mostly on powered shears in the 14 gage (.075″ x 10′) range and heavier, which are found in most fabrication shops across North America.

Process Description:

Shearing sheet or plate steel is very much like that of using scissors to cut paper or cardboard. The blades come together at a minimum distance or offset that we describe as “blade gap” in order to fracture the material into the desired blank sizes for further processing.  The lower blade is fixed into the “Bed” of the shear while the upper blade moves either in a straight up and down “guillotine” fashion or a swinging “rotary” motion.  The thicker or harder the material, the wider the blades must be gapped apart or the blade angles increased (rake angle) in order to reduce the amount of tonnage required to shear (or fracture) the material up to the given rating of the machine.

A quality shear can save many hours on further processes such as bending, welding and assembly so it is important that you ensure you are capable of making quality, clean cuts that are square, accurate and can be repeated quickly.  Some of the key factors in choosing a shear are described below and when selecting a shear, whether new or used, these factors should be considered in the decision making process.

Hydraulic Shears Capacity Chart
Hydraulic Shears Capacity Chart Courtesy of Accurpress America

Components of a Shear:

All shears are made up of the same basic components and they are as follows:

  1. Main Frame:The Main Frame of the machine is what supports all the other components, bed and drive system.  A quality shear has a tough and heavy frame for the material size and rating.  Some lightly built shears are known to be susceptible to having fractured side frames, cracked beds or warped rams due to poor design or abuse.
  2. Bed:The bed is what your operator will be working on as he introduces material to the shear blades.  The bed is the support for not only the material but also the lower shearing blade.  A quality shears bed should be heavy and solid with conveniences for material handling like cut outs for the operator to slip his hands under the sheet of material for lifting and for larger capacity shears, ball transfers to “roll” the material being sheared easier into place.
  3. Squaring Arm: A squaring arm is crucial in ensuring the material being cut is at shear squaring arma square 90 degrees.  In order to achieve proper squareness, a squaring arm is used that has been setup and adjusted to ensure it is perfectly square to the shearing blades.  This squaring arm can also have a measuring scale on it which can help in measuring very short sheared parts from the front of the machine as opposed to using the gage bar as a stop behind the shear blades.  Typically the squaring arm is equal to the length of the shear blades but can be any length that works for the application you are selecting it for.
  4. Hold Downs: “Hold downs” are clamps (multiple or a single bar type clamp) that is located closely to the shear blades and firmly holds the material being sheared to prevent it from moving during the shearing process, and most importantly for tipping up which would introduce the material as a wedge between the upper and lower blades forcing the blades to gap wider. Typically the more force and number of hold downs equates to the sign of a better and higher quality shear.
  5. Blades:The cutting (or shearing) blades are typically tool steel and are hardened for wear resistance and ground for sharpness. They are mounted on the upper moving ram and the lower fixed bed and gapped usually just a few thousandths of an inch apart.  The blades can be “flipped” when worn from progressive use to another side, resharpened or replaced.  Shears typically have blades that have 2 sharp sides or 4 sides for use depending on the design of the machine.
  6. Gaging (Measuring System):  While not specific to every shear, gaging (or a part length stop/measuring system), is on about 95% of the shears on the market today.  Proper gaging is crucial for not only maintaining the correct sheared length, but for allowing the operator to quickly “gage” the next sheared blank and repeat the process very quickly.  Usually these “Gages” (or stops) are at the rear of the shear and commonly are computer controlled, screw driven gage bars for bumping the material up against.  These gages can be manually or electronically (programmed) positioned to provide for multiple sheared lengths as well as repeated use of the same length. A quality gaging system will be strong enough to support material weight equivalent to the the full capacity of the shear for many years to come.
  7. Control:A shear control can be as simple as a hand wheel manually positioning the back gage in conjunction with a foot/clutch pedal, or can be as extensive as a programmable gaging system allowing for precise programmable positioning of the gage system while keeping an accurate cycle count.  While most shear gage controllers are used as a simple “Go Here” positioner, many are capable of much more including shearing “kits” of multiple part pieces and lengths all positioned and counted automatically.
  8. Accessories/Options:A shear can be customized to meet a variety of needs by adding optional accessories that can make the operation of the shear simpler, faster, more accurate and more reliable. Common shear options include:
    • Stacker/Conveyor
    • Hydraulic Cooling Systems
    • Front Gaging
    • Extended Backgages
    • High Speed (Hydraulics Only)
    • Safety Options like light curtains, fencing, etc.
    • Ball Transfers in the Bed
    • Hand Cutouts
    • Scales in the Bed
    • Mitering Squares
    • Special Bed Machining or Tapping for Accessories

Types of Shears

Guillotine

A “Guillotine” design in a shear refers to the upper blades action of motion.  The blade is driven in a straight direction by a mechanism and way system driving the ram and blade straight down and up. Usually this design equates to a bigger heavier design in a shear and is almost always found on designs rated in the 1/2″ capacity or greater.

Swing Beam

A swing beam design shear uses the power of leverage through a cantilevered ram to increase tonnage and thus shearing capacity.  Placing the upper blade on a pivoting mechanized ram, the blade is then forced down by mechanical or hydraulic actuation using the power of leverage.  This design usually equates to a shorter in height machine design and also blades that must be relieved for clearance allowing typically for only 2 cutting edges per blade.  There are also modified versions of this design that are some of the most popular designs sold today.

Types of Shear Drive Systems

Hydraulic

Hydraulic pressure is applied through one or more cylinders to force the ram and upper blade of the machine down. Hydraulic machines can have typically one or two hydraulic cylinders for operation.

Mechanical

A motor spins a large flywheel at high speed the operator then engages a clutch which can be activated via pneumatic, hydraulic or mechanical engagement.  Once the clutch is engaged the moving flywheel is mated to a crankshaft in which the machines ram is attached.  The crankshaft then spins cycling the ram and shear blade up and down.

Other Shear Design Factors to Consider:

Rake Angle: “Rake Angle” is the angle of the upper cutting blade as it is introduced past the lower cutting blade.  This angle of introduction allows for only a small portion of material to actually be engaged with the blades at any given time, thus greatly reducing the forces required to shear long lengths.  Ideally, if the force required to shear a part was of no consideration then a machine would have ZERO rake angle as it would theoretically provide for the straightest sheared part and quickest cycle time. However since shears are typically working with 120-144″ of material length or more, the amount of the force required would be massive and therefore, cost prohibitive.  “Rake” angle is thus necessary in order to minimize the actual force required to “fracture or cut” the material being sheared.

Ideally a quality machine has as minimum a rake angle as possible, typically 1/4″ of angle per foot, as excessive rake angle can cause Twist (sheared part curling) and/or Bow (Sheared part rolling into an arc).

Adjustable Rake Angle: Some shear manufacturers use a mechanism that allows the upper blade to varyterial being cut is at shear squaring arma square 90 degrees.  In order to achieve proper squareness, a squaring arm is used that has been setup and adjusted to ensure it is perfectly square to the shearing blades.  This squaring arm can also have a measuring scale on it which can help in measuring very short sheared parts from the front of the machine as opposed to using the gage bar as a stop behind the shear blades.  Typically the squaring arm is equal to the length of the shear blades but can be any length that works for the application you are selecting it for.

  • Hold Downs: “Hold downs” are clamps (multiple or a single bar type clamp) that is located closely to the shear blades and firmly holds the material being sheared to prevent it from moving during the shearing process, and most importantly for tipping up which would introduce the material as a wedge between the upper and lower blades forcing the blades to gap wider. Typically the more force and number of hold downs equates to the sign of a better and higher quality shear.
  • Blades:The cutting (or shearing) blades are typically tool steel and are hardened for wear resistance and ground for sharpness. They are mounted on the upper moving ram and the lower fixed bed and gapped usually just a few thousandths of an inch apart.  The blades can be “flipped” when worn from progressive use to another side, resharpened or replaced.  Shears typically have blades that have 2 sharp sides or 4 sides for use depending on the design of the machine.
  • Gaging (Measuring System):  While not specific to every shear, gaging (or a part length stop/measuring system), is on about 95% of the shears on the market today.  Proper gaging is crucial for not only maintaining the correct sheared length, but for allowing the operator to quickly “gage” the next sheared blank and repeat the process very quickly.  Usually these “Gages” (or stops) are at the rear of the shear and commonly are computer controlled, screw driven gage bars for bumping the material up against.  These gages can be manually or electronically (programmed) positioned to provide for multiple sheared lengths as well as repeated use of the same length. A quality gaging system will be strong enough to support material weight equivalent to the the full capacity of the shear for many years to come.
  • Control:A shear control can be as simple as a hand wheel manually positioning the back gage in conjunction with a foot/clutch pedal, or can be as extensive as a programmable gaging system allowing for precise programmable positioning of the gage system while keeping an accurate cycle count.  While most shear gage controllers are used as a simple “Go Here” positioner, many are capable of much more including shearing “kits” of multiple part pieces and lengths all positioned and counted automatically.
  • Accessories/Options:A shear can be customized to meet a variety of needs by adding optional accessories that can make the operation of the shear simpler, faster, more accurate and more reliable. Common shear options include:
    • Stacker/Conveyor
    • Hydraulic Cooling Systems
    • Front Gaging
    • Extended Backgages
    • High Speed (Hydraulics Only)
    • Safety Options like light curtains, fencing, etc.
    • Ball Transfers in the Bed
    • Hand Cutouts
    • Scales in the Bed
    • Mitering Squares
    • Special Bed Machining or Tapping for Accessories

 

Types of Shears

Guillotine

A “Guillotine” design in a shear refers to the upper blades action of motion.  The blade is driven in a straight direction by a mechanism and way system driving the ram and blade straight down and up. Usually this design equates to a bigger heavier design in a shear and is almost always found on designs rated in the 1/2″ capacity or greater.

Swing Beam

A swing beam design shear uses the power of leverage through a cantilevered ram to increase tonnage and thus shearing capacity.  Placing the upper blade on a pivoting mechanized ram, the blade is then forced down by mechanical or hydraulic actuation using the power of leverage.  This design usually equates to a shorter in height machine design and also blades that must be relieved for clearance allowing typically for only 2 cutting edges per blade.  There are also modified versions of this design that are some of the most popular designs sold today.

Types of Shear Drive Systems

Hydraulic

Hydraulic pressure is applied through one or more cylinders to force the ram and upper blade of the machine down. Hydraulic machines can have typically one or two hydraulic cylinders for operation.

Mechanical

A motor spins a large flywheel at high speed the operator then engages a clutch which can be activated via pneumatic, hydraulic or mechanical engagement.  Once the clutch is engaged the moving flywheel is mated to a crankshaft in which the machines ram is attached.  The crankshaft then spins cycling the ram and shear blade up and down.

Other Shear Design Factors to Consider:

Rake Angle: “Rake Angle” is the angle of the upper cutting blade as it is introduced past the lower cutting blade.  This angle of introduction allows for only a small portion of material to actually be engaged with the blades at any given time, thus greatly reducing the forces required to shear long lengths.  Ideally, if the force required to shear a part was of no consideration then a machine would have ZERO rake angle as it would theoretically provide for the straightest sheared part and quickest cycle time. However since shears are typically working with 120-144″ of material length or more, the amount of the force required would be massive and therefore, cost prohibitive.  “Rake” angle is thus necessary in order to minimize the actual force required to “fracture or cut” the material being sheared.

Ideally a quality machine has as minimum a rake angle as possible, typically 1/4″ of angle per foot, as excessive rake angle can cause Twist (sheared part curling) and/or Bow (Sheared part rolling into an arc).

Adjustable Rake Angle: Some shear manufacturers use a mechanism that allows the upper blade to vary the angle of rake in order to maximize the shears capacity.  By increasing the angle of rake, the amount of thicker material actually engaged in the blades remains within the shears power “window”.  While these manufacturers advertise this as a “benefit” of their machine, the reality is they are offering a much lighter machine with the capability to shear thicker material through this increased rake angle.  When choosing a shear with variable rake angle, be sure to investigate it thoroughly as to what its capacity is at its lowest, or recommended, rake setting as this is really what the shear was designed to handle and greater thicknesses are only achieved through increase the rake angle and thus increasing the Twist and Bow you can expect in resulting sheared part.

 

Blade Gap Adjustment: In any shearing operation the higher the offset between the upper and lower blades, the lower the force required to break, or fracture the material.  As the blade gap becomes excessive, burring (or tearing) begins to occur on the sheared blanks.  If Blade Gap is set too closely then the force required to break the material can be in excess beyond the shears ability.  Because different materials like Aluminum, Steel and Stainless steel have different fracturing forces they require different blade gap settings to ensure you are getting the best quality sheared part for the given material type and thickness you are working with.   All shears come with the ability to “Gap” the blades either by manual shimming (very slow), Bed/Lower Blade adjustment (slow) or by a quick blade gap adjusting mechanism which also can be powered (fastest).  Depending on the range of material types and thickness you are working with will determine the necessity for a quick blade gap adjustment feature on your shear.  

Common Arguments when Selecting a Shear 

 

Argument 1:  Mechanical vs. Hydraulics- Which is better?
When selecting a shear many people assume that hydraulic operation is a better option as they equate it with a press brake. However shearing is a completely different process and mechanical actuation can actually be preferred in a shear due to the following factors?

  • Speed:Mechanical Shears are faster in full cycle mode
  • Simplicity: Mechanical Shears have simpler mechanisms to maintain and repair making up time longer and downtime shorter
  • Noise:Mechanical Shears are quieter as they do not have the constant running of hydraulics
  • Heat: Without hydraulics mechanical shears run much cooler
  • Green:No hydraulic Oil, No Hydraulic Heat (requiring cooling), No Hydraulic Oil Waste, No Filter Waste

Where hydraulic shears have an advantage is:

  • Variable Stroke Length:Mechanical shears must make the full cycle when shearing whereas hydraulic shears can be set perform quick short strokes useful when shearing material of only a few inches in width.
  • Overload Protection: Protected by a blowout valve a hydraulic shear can stop the blade from getting into a “locked” position with the material as when the hydraulics reach the maximum PSI for the shear a safety valve opens up and dumps the high pressure hydraulics stopping the downward force and thus allowing the ram to backed off and the oversize/hard/obstruction to be removed.

Argument 2: Pit Vs. No Pit – Which is Better?

As shears increase in material thickness capabilities (force/tonnage), or stretch out in width, they may require a “pit”, or more accurately described as a slot in the floor.  The reason this relief in the floor is required is due the mechanical properties of shearing that cause both the bed and ram to deflect under the high tonnage required.  While adding mass to the ram (upper part of the shear) simply makes the machine taller, adding mass to the bed would raise the working height of the machine beyond a comfortable level.  Therefore the easiest and best way to counter these forces is to add more mass to the bed and put that mass below the floor.  By adding this mass the manufacturers have made a stronger, heavier machine that can operate with low rake angle for good quality parts and will not flex under load.  This added mass actually increases the rigidity, part quality, life expectancy and manufacturing cost of the shear and therefore is found in better quality heavier and wider shears.

The best method for keeping the machine and parts straight is to not let it bend in the first place and thus a pit is actually preferred over flush floor mount machines in higher capacities (3/8″ and up) or wider widths (14′ and Wider).

Southern Fabricating Machinery Sales staff are shear experts and can assist you in selecting the best shear for your applications AND budget. You can visit Southern Fabricating Machinery Sales, a Member of MDNA at https://www.southernfabsales.com/ (Article Written by, Andy Kamashian, AEA Southern Fabricating Machinery Sales, Inc.)

For more information on shears or to buy, sell or trade them you can also contact any of MDNA’s machinery dealers, located around the world, by using the Find Members>Search tool on mdna.org  

Newly Elected MDNA President Joe Lundvick

MDNA 76th Annual Convention Re-Cap on what you missed…

MDNA’s 76th Annual Convention & Business Meetings were held on May 4-7, 2017 at Disney World’s BoardWalk Inn in Orlando, FL.   No matter how old or young, attendees of this year’s convention felt the magic in the air around them. The attendees were treated to educational seminars, exciting activities and popular social and networking events.  All of which would not be possible without the strong support of the Convention Sponsors (see below.)

Being at Disney’s Boardwalk Inn gave attendees a plethora of options with the surrounding parks and activities but, for those interested in learning, there were four educational seminars with numerous takeaways.

AMEA conducted an entertaining valuation program that spoofed Hollywood Squares.  Participants matched wits and appraisal knowledge with members of the AMEA Board of Directors hosted by Don Bentley, CEA and Doris Toronyi, CEA.

MDNA presented the following three educational seminars:

Seminar #1 –  John Taucher, CEA, of MDNA Member Firm, Portage Packaging and Neal J. Novak, Regional Vice President of Alex N. Sill Company (North America’s Leading Firm of Loss Consultants & Appraisers), presented a seminar entitled “Are You Prepared For A Disaster?”.  This presentation included a firsthand account by Mr. Taucher of the many hurtles and pitfalls that follow a catastrophic loss to your business and how a firm like the Sill Company can help you navigate the process of rebuilding. Log into to the Member’s Only Back Office to view the PowerPoint that accompanied this presentation and go to >Resources> Presentation Slides 

Seminar #2 – Joint Venture Standards & Procedures Panel Discussion was led by Joe Lundvick, CEA, of Perfection Global LLC, Jack Boecher, AEA, of Raco Industrial Corp., Paul Lashin, of Prestige Equipment, and Troy Clark, of Clark Machinery Sales.  Topics included: When should a joint venture machine be paid for? What are acceptable expenses? What rate should be used for cleaning versus repairing? Is a salesperson’s commission a shared expense? Should overhead be part of the expenses? Should the partner know who the machine was sold to?

Seminar #3 – Exporting and U.S. Government Help was presented by Kenneth R. Mouradian, Director, Orlando U.S. Export Assistance Center U.S. Commercial Service Orlando U.S. Department of Commerce.  He explained many of the services and assistance opportunities available to U.S. businesses doing business abroad.   Log into to the Member’s Only Back Office to view the PowerPoint that accompanied this presentation and go to >Resources> Presentation Slides 

Networking and Social Event Coverage:

Our widely popular social and networking events kicked off with an entertaining Disney tunes sing-along. Thursday night’s welcome party was in an ideal location at Disney’s Atlantic Dance Hall and included all of the keys to success:  a talented band, superb food and beverages, business networking and reacquainting with old friends from overseas as far as England and Germany. To top the night, Micky and Minnie Mouse surprised all with a special appearance!

Friday morning’s rain let up just in time to allow our spouse contingent to take advantage of a private outdoor patio inside of Epcot for their own form of networking, at a special champagne brunch.  Friday night all attendees gathered at this private island for a sumptuous reception and spectacular view of Disney’s Illuminations, fireworks and lasers show.

Saturday commenced with the Awards Breakfast and Annual meeting.  Newly Elected AMEA President Randy Koster, CEA, presented the MDNA Leadership Award to Robert Yeoman, CEA. The Leadership award is presented to recognize exemplary and extraordinary leadership qualities demonstrated by a current member of the MDNA Board of Directors, MIS Executive Committee or AMEA Board of Directors who has made significant contributions to the association or one of its subsidiaries. Traditionally, this award has been given to individuals who have already made significant contributions to the association or its subsidiaries in a leadership role, and are poised to go on to even greater service to MDNA.  In presenting this award Randy said “I could not think of a more deserving person.”  Bob currently sits on both the MDNA and AMEA Boards as a Director and his contributions have been felt throughout the entire organization.  In addition to his service on the two Boards and his stellar performance as Chicago Chapter Chairman, Bob was the chief architect and fund raiser behind the MDNA Chicago Chapter/IMTS Meeting and Dinner, without question the largest Chapter Meeting in the Country.

Newly Elected MDNA President Joe LundvickThe Annual Meeting is also the time when the association elects its new officers.  This year the National Nominating Chairman Paul Lashin, CEA, of Prestige Equipment presided over the introduction of the slate of officers.  And after unanimous consent from the members in attendance Joe Lundvick, CEA, of Perfection Global LLC, was elected MDNA President.  The slate of national officers presented and approved also included First Vice President John Greene, CEA, F L Sales Inc., Second Vice President Craig Ward, CEA, F. P. Miller Co., Treasurer Ed Krause, FH Machinery.  Five Directors at Large were elected; John Butz, ReSell CNC, Troy Clark, Clark Machinery Sales LLC, Dan Wheeler, CEA, Wheeler Machinery Inc., Charlie Winternitz, CEA, Loeb Winternitz Industrial Auctioneers and Robert Yeoman, CEA, Yeoman Machinery Corporation.

Kim Khoury recieves Plaque for her service as MDNA President from newly elected MDNA President Joe LundvickThe celebration continued through to the President’s Banquet where all attendees danced the night away after a program that included a wonderful introductory speech by the newly elected president, who thanked and honored his predecessor, now Past President, Kim Khoury and all who helped mold him into the man and MDNA Member he is today.

On Saturday President of the ADLSF Kristine Conroy and the trustees conducted theMannions dancing annual scholarship raffle drawing and the big winner was sitting at the head table (MDNA First Vice President John Greene of FL Sales, Inc.) This was John’s second time as the big winner.  Other winning amounts included: $2,000 – John Becker of Heat Treat Equipment Co.; $1,500 – Nate Arnold of Arnold Equipment Co., and winner of $1,000 – John Butz of ReSell CNC.

Greene Wins AGAINThe program portion of the evening also included presenting the MDNA Randolph K. Vinson Award to, now retired MDNA Member, Richard Levy.   This award is named in honor of MDNA’s long-time professional staff director (who retired in 1965) and is presented to individuals in recognition of and in appreciation for outstanding and continuous contributions to the advancement of MDNA and the used machinery industry.  After climbing the Rick Levy receives Earl Elmanranks of the AMEA to become President Mr. Levy turned around and served in all of the MDNA officer positions culminating in his service as MDNA President in 2007 to 2009 and remained on the Board until 2015.  In accepting the award, he commented that he was deeply touched and was honored that he had been involved with the MDNA for literally his entire machinery career.

View more photos from Convention here:

Proud Mom and Dad of MDNA Past President Kim Khoury

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View Photo candids from MDNA Convention here

Professional Photos from the Presidential Banquet can be found here: www.disneyeventphotography.com (The event name is: MDNAAnnualConvention)

Yoder Sighting

 

Huge Thank You To All Of Our Convention Sponsors!

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edm

Why should I purchase a USED Wire EDM for my Manufacturing Plant?

Written By: Scott Buth, CEA, Alternative Machine Tool, LLC (MDNA Member Firm)

wire edm, usedThe answer is simple. . .because it’s easy. You may have been approached by a customer to add Wire EDM capabilities or you are currently sending out your Wire EDM work, but you no longer need to do so. You don’t know where to start? Here’s a guide to help you.

Wire EDM (Electrical Discharge Machine) is a CNC machine that cuts most conductive materials with high precision. The computer control guides a thin fine brass wire around a predetermined path. Sparks controlled by the machine jump from the wire to the conductive material thousands of times per second, eroding the material away with high accuracy. The cut speed is determined by material type, material thickness and cutting conditions. Uses for a Wire EDM can be as simple as shape cutting of production parts to extreme accuracy and surface finish requirements found in Aerospace and Medical.

The infancy of Wire EDM is over, and the machines have become common placed in many shops. It is no longer considered the “Black Magic” that is was in the Late 80’s. While the machines are still specialized in comparison to purchasing a CNC Machining Center or CNC Lathe, a dealer that specializes in EDM can help you to make your venture into Wire EDM simple and painless.

You should consider the following parameters when shopping for a Wire EDM

  • What is the size of the part that I need to cut? (Both the overall block and the actual cut.)
  • What is the thickness of my part? (This will determine the Z Axis Height required)
  • Do I need to cut a Taper on my Part? (This will determine if you need at least a 4 Axis Machine)
  • Is my part need to be flat on the Top and Bottom? (This will determine if you need a Submerged Tank)
  • Will I be starting my cut inside a start hole or will I come in from an outside edge?
  • Do I need an Automatic Wire Threader to be able to run the machine unattended?
  • How will I program the machine? Will I use my existing CAM software?
  • When I purchase the machine who will install it and train my operators?
  • Is the machine I am considering still supported by the OEM?
  • Where will I purchase my supplies such as Wire and Filters after I buy a machine?

Alternative Machine Tool and it sister companies (Midwest EDM and Desert EDM) are edm3making it easy for manufacturing companies to add a Wire EDM to their capabilities, without braking the bank. We have the people and processes to get you started in or add to your capacity in Wire EDM.

You can visit Alternative Machine Tool, A member of MDNA at http://alternativemachinetool.com/

For more information on USED WIRE EDM’s or to buy, sell or trade them you can also contact any of MDNA’s machinery dealers, located around the world, by using the Find Members>Search tool on mdna.org 

edm2
Scott Buth, CEA, Alternative Machine Tool, LLC (MDNA Member Firm)

 

Sturbridge Mass Meeting   (4)[1]

New England Chapter Meeting – Testimonials/ Recap

On February 16th MDNA’s New England Chapter met in Putnam, CT for a manufacturing tour of Phillips-Moldex Company followed by a chapter dinner meeting with special guests from The Smaller Manufacturers Association of CT: Doug Johnson, President of Marion Manufacturing, Board Member of the SMA, Chairs the SMA Education Committee, Ronald Turmel, Vice President and General Manager, H&T Waterbury, Inc., Board Member of the SMA.

View a full photo album from this meeting on the MDNA Facebook page here

Here’s what some of our MDNA Members who attended had to say about this meeting:

Sturbridge Mass Meeting   (30)
(R TO L) Kevin Brewster, NE Chapter Chairman, President of On Target Machinery; Tim Barry of Phillips-Moldex; Phil Dalrymple, Owner of Northwest Shippers Inc.; Doug Johnson, President of Marion Manufacturing; Ronald Turmel, VP of H&T Waterbury, Inc.

I am so glad we were able to put this meeting together. Invitations went out last minute, because it was difficult to get all the pieces into place. As hard as this was, we could have never pulled this off without the help / support of Nate Smith, Stephen Papillo and Julie Brewster. We have so many to thank for this meeting, our sponsor Phil Dalrymple President of Northwest Shippers Inc., and our company tour guide Tim Barry, Vice President of Phillips-Moldex Company; Doug Johnson, President of Marion Manufacturing, and Ronald Turmel, Vice President H&T Waterbury, Inc.  Both Doug, and Ronald are Board Members of The Smaller Manufacturers Association of Connecticut, SMA-CT.

I think our chapter members had very eye opening experiences as they heard 3 separate manufacturing companies convening the same concerns about the future of manufacturing. I also feel we took big steps to bridge a gap that night between Manufacturing End-Users and MDNA’s New England Chapter. We are on common ground with the fact that we need to cultivate our future incomes. In the process of the night I saw our members realize that this could be achieved by working together to inspire future careers into the trades. We heard several times throughout the night how young tool makers are needed, but do not exist. This is a very valid concern because the average tool maker is in his late 50’s to early 60’s at best. This is a skill that needs to be learned, or it could be lost forever. Helping repair this will insure our future sales income. I definitely will be moving forward to help the technical schools within Connecticut and around the country as much as we can.

–Kevin Brewster President / AEA, On Target Machine Brokers LLC., New England Chapter MDNA Chairman and Board Representative


“Great New England Chapter Meeting the other night. We were introduced to two members of a sister metalworking organization right here in Connecticut that I didn’t know existed. We will be working with them on common goals in the future. Also met a new Premier Vendor freight company, Northwest Shipping, who sponsored the meeting and had a rep fly in from the west coast. Well worth the time and the drive.”

–John W. Conroy, CEA, MDNA Past President, Machinery International Corp.


That was a great meeting.

Really appreciate all of your hard work to put it together. It was very successful. Thanks!

–Kristine Conroy, Machinery International Corp., Austin .D. Lucas Scholarship Fund President


The Boston/NE Chapter of MDNA featured a plant tour of Phillips-Moldex CO in Putnam, CT, 06260 on February 16, 2017.

The tour was led by the VP of Manufacturing, Timothy J. Barry, accompanied by MDNA members and guests. The tour featured late model electrically controlled plastic injection molding machines in operation and they were equipped with robotic pick and place, largely for automotive parts, such as, steering column levers with knob add-ons. The machines and plant were exceptionally well maintained with state-of-the-art plastic fiber dispensing system.

The tour included the entire facility, approximately 50,000 sq. ft. nestled within a modern manufacturing area in a small town…an impressive layout suited for growth of manufacturing in a historic political and economic time in the USA where the political emphasis is bringing jobs back to America. Phillips-Moldex is ready for the challenge.

Kevin Brewster, Chapter MDNA Chairman and Nate Smith, Membership Chairman were responsible for the exciting chapter meeting program with dinner and meeting presentation in Sturbridge Village, MA.

Special meeting guests Doug Johnson, President of Marion Manufacturing and Ronald Turmel, VP H&T Waterbury, Inc., both board members of the SMA-CT gave a presentation to the group.

All who attended had a meaningful tour, learned about the state of plastic injection molding machinery and tooling and had a chance to ask questions and increase knowledge and challenges. Northwest Shippers provided drinks and event sponsorship.

–David Gold, ASA, AMEA, Gold Machinery Group

View a full photo album from this meeting on the MDNA Facebook page here

Walt-Disney-Studios

13 Insider Tips For DISNEY WORLD

MDNA Convention Blog Spot, 13 Insider Tips For DISNEY WORLD

Courtesy of Steve & Joanne Bignell, K. Braly Machinery Inc.Walt-Disney-Studios

  1. Get the My Disney Experience App Here you can link all of your reservations together to create an itinerary. Once you have a hotel reservation and park tickets you can book dining and FastPasses through the app. You can also connect with friends!

2. Fastpasses are the best way to avoid long lineups. For the more popular attractions this is the best way to go. There is no additional fee but there are a limited number of Fastpasses available per day so be sure to book them as soon as possible.  These give you a particular time to arrive at an attraction and go into a special line that is significantly shorter than the regular stand by option. Fastpasses can be modified via the app or at kiosks around the park. Fastpasses can be booked 60 days before your arrival date.

3. Some of the attractions that tend to have the longest wait are:

  • Seven dwarfs mine train (Magic Kingdom)
  • Space Mountain (Magic Kingdom)
  • Peter Pan’s Flight (Magic Kingdom)
  • Soarin’ (Epcot)
  • Test Track (Epcot)
  • Frozen (Epcot)
  • Toy Story Mania (Hollywood Studios)
  • Expedition Everest (Animal Kingdom)

4. Each day 1 of the four parks opens early or remains open later exclusively for resort guests. Take advantage of this! Parks are a lot less busy during these times.

5. Character dining is very popular. If you have little ones that want to meet the characters this is the best way to do it. There is a character breakfast at Cape May Café which is walking distance from our hotel.

6. Disney World has a lot of great restaurants for big kids too. Here are some of our favorites within walking distance from the hotel:

  • Flying Fish (Boardwalk Resort)
  • Yachtsman Steakhouse (Yacht Club Resort)
  • Todd English Bluezoo (Swan and Dolphin Resort)
  • Il Mulions (Swan and Dolphin Resort)
  • Beaches and Cream (Beach Club Resort, Try the kitchen sink!)

7. Some of our other favorite restaurants are:

  • Tiffins (Animal Kingdom)
  • Tutto Gusto (Italy pavilion in Epcot-a hidden gem, walk-ins only)
  • Teppan Edo (Japan pavilion in Epcot-great for kids!)
  • Morimoto (Disney Springs)

8. Dining reservations can be booked 180 days before your arrival (so any time now!)

9. Parking is free at all of the parks for resort guests

10. Once you book your flights you can book the Magical Express. This is a free bus directly from the airport to the hotel. They even take care of your luggage so you don’t have to wait for it!

11. There is a boat to Epcot and Hollywood Studios from the hotel. There is also a path to walk. Free buses are provided from the hotel to Magic Kingdom, Animal Kingdom and Disney Springs.

12. Refillable mugs are available at the bakery on the Boardwalk and can be used for free refills for the duration of your stay.

13. Boardwalk is also home to the dueling piano bar Jelly Rolls. This bar is for guests over 21 and is a fun night out!