Email Spoofing Alert, Best Practices and Security

E-mail spoofing is the forgery of an e-mail header so that the message appears to have originated from someone or somewhere other than the actual source.
Security recommendations include:

If you have an IT Department: There is an “SPF” or Sender Policy Framework record in place for the MDNA.ORG domain.  An SPF record isa DNS record that defines which servers on the EMAIL-SPOOFINGinternet are authorized to send messages on the behalf of a particular domain.  Currently, the SPF records define the servers from McAfee / MX Logic, the external e-mail security system being used for MDNA.ORG, as the authorized servers.

In order for SPF to work properly, your company IT department needs to tune their e-mail security systems so that SPF record validation is enabled for all incoming e-mail from the MDNA.ORG domain.

Basic Safe Practices

Never click unfamiliar links or download unfamiliar attachments. This may seem like a no-brainer, but all it takes is one employee in a company seeing a message from their boss or someone else in the company to open an attachment or click a funny Google Docs link to expose the entire corporate network. Many of us think we’re above being tricked that way, but it happens all the time. Pay attention to the messages you get, don’t click links in email (go to your bank’s, cable company’s, or other website directly and log in to find what they want you to see), and don’t download email attachments you’re not explicitly expecting. Keep your computer’s anti-malware up to date.

Turn up your spam filters, and use tools like Priority Inbox. Setting your spam filters a little stronger may—depending on your mail provider—make the difference between a message that fails its SPF check landing in spam versus your inbox. bandovetinh Similarly, if you can use services like Gmail’s Priority Inbox or Apple’s VIP, you essentially let the mail server figure out the important people for you. If an important person is spoofed, you’ll still get it, though.

Learn to read message headers, and trace IP addresses.  When a suspicious email comes in, you can open the headers, look at the IP address of the sender, and see if it matches up with previous emails from the same person. You can even do a reverse lookup on the sender’s IP to see where it is—which may or may not be informative, but if you get an email from your friend across town that originated in Russia (and they’re not traveling), you know something’s up.